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Access Management, Authentication, Cloud, Cloud Infrastructure, Credentials, customer experience, Hybrid Cloud, Identity & Access, Identity and Access Management (IAM), insider threats, Multifactor Authentication (MFA), Password, password reuse, Single Sign-On (SSO),

Reap the Promise of One and Done Authentication With SSO

Every day, the average business employee inputs credentials to authenticate identity and access apps and sites several times — using one of the 8–12 passwords the average person has, according to the “IBM Future of Identity Report.” If you get your password wrong too many times, you’re locked out and you call the IT help center to reset it, again. Which leads you, the help center and the system administrator all to think there must be a better way. Fortunately, there is single sign-on (SSO).

What is SSO? It’s a user authentication technology that requires only one set of credentials to provide access to everything you need. Once you’re authenticated on a centralized platform in an enterprise, for example, you can use a range of applications — from on-premises programs to cloud resources to software-as-a-service (SaaS) apps such as Salesforce and Office 365 — without logging in and out again.

Eliminate the Problems With Passwords

A typical employee may start with only a few credentials, but after a few weeks or months, that number will quickly increase. Furthermore, according to the “Future of Identity Report,” only 42 percent of millennials use complex passwords (versus 49 percent of people over the age of 55) and 41 percent reuse the same password multiple times (versus 31 percent). Administrators may be sympathetic to password fatigue and interrupted user experiences, but security is an even greater concern. Verizon’s “2018 Data Breach Investigations Report” listed stolen credentials as one of the leading causes of data breaches.

What users are accessing with those passwords is also critical; another key factor behind many breaches is the abuse of access privileges. Many enterprises fail to implement access management solutions that ensure employees have only the privileges they need to do their jobs. This puts the organization at greater risk given that insider threats are at the root of 60 percent of cyberattacks.

If you’re an administrator, you oversee databases that hold passwords, permissions for access to applications and resources, help center troubleshooting and support to change credentials, and training to keep users from falling for phishing scams or other hacks that could result in a breach. That can be a lot, especially for larger companies with hundreds or thousands of employees.

The solution requires taking responsibility for security away from users by eliminating the need to have multiple passwords.

Implement SSO for Seamless User Experiences

Single sign-on changes how authentication and identity and access management work. Normally, when you want to sign up for an application, the server first verifies whether you already have an account. If not, the server securely stores your email and encrypted password in a database. The server then creates a session and sends a token confirming your identity. Your browser stores the token in a cookie that verifies your identity when you’re logged in. Next time you want to log in, the server compares your password to what’s in the database and you’re in or out.

With federated SSO, however, you get another option. You’ve probably been asked if you want to sign up for an app or site using Facebook or Google, for example. Various standards, including Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML), Open Authorization (OAuth) and OpenID Connect (OIDC), let these web giants give third-party apps and sites access to your information.

You choose your provider — say, Google — and the third party verifies that you’re already logged in to Google. If not, you log in and then choose what information you’re willing to share with the third party. Google verifies that both you and the third party are legitimate, then authenticates you based on its own password database and issues a token back to the site. The third-party site can now associate you with the user data you’re willing to share — such as preferences, previous sales and so on — and you can move seamlessly between applications for which you have access without logging in each time.

A Win-Win for Users and Administrators

It’s easy to see why users would love SSO, whether they’re at home or at work. In the enterprise, they can use one set of credentials to access all their apps instead of remembering, looking up and frequently resetting multiple passwords. New users can sign up for accounts easily and securely, using a provider they already trust.

Administrators, on the other hand, can securely provide access to resources and applications, whether they’re on premises, in the cloud or in a hybrid cloud. But to reduce risk, it’s critical to focus on security as well as convenience.

Ensure the Upside Isn’t a Downside

Forrester emphasizes that authentication is mission-critical infrastructure in “Now Tech: Authentication Management Solutions, Q3 2018.” If an SSO provider experiences a security breach or an authenticator goes down, users can’t get online. And if only one set of credentials is needed to access a multitude of apps and resources, the security around those credentials must be ironclad. After single sign-on implementation, compromised credentials give a threat actor entry not just to one resource, but all of them.

More secure authentication should include access without passwords, such as scanning a code with a user’s phone; frictionless biometrics, such as fingerprint, voice or face recognition; and geolocation. For example, IBM Cloud Identity provides seamless and secure authentication for native, web, mobile or cloud applications via biometrics, FIDO2, Universal Second Factor (U2F), FaceID, Touch ID, email/SMS one-time passwords or soft tokens. The solution can also reduce reliance on passwords by providing multifactor authentication (MFA) to any target system, including virtual private network (VPNs), mainframes, Linux or desktop.

An ideal solution will also incorporate risk-based authentication. For example, an employee logging in from her desktop at 2 p.m. on a workday may gain access with just a single password, but a user across the globe logging in on a new device at midnight may require MFA.

Evolving With Your Ecosystem

Perhaps the best feature of SSO is its scalability; you can future-proof access management, as this case study on POST Luxembourg showed. As your enterprise changes and grows, you can continue to provide a convenient sign-on experience to users, customers and partners and a centralized solution that gives them secure and integrated access to resources via almost any device, anytime and anywhere.

IT administrators, line-of-business managers and employees all benefit from an identity and access management solution like single sign-on. It allows registered users to access applications with one set of credentials, provides a centralized place for admins to manage all protected applications and configure access policy settings, and, best of all, the cloud has made single sign-on implementation more affordable and less time-intensive than ever.

Learn how an IAM solution can benefit you

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Author: Diana Kightlinger

Application Development, Application Security, Authentication, Chief Information Security Officer (CISO), CISO, Cybersecurity Jobs, DevOps, New Collar, passwords, Security by Design, Security Professionals, Security Strategy, Skills Gap, Software Development,

Creating Meaningful Diversity of Thought in the Cybersecurity Workforce

The other day, I learned something that great French winemakers have known for centuries: It is often difficult to make a complex wine from just one variety of grape. It is easier to blend the juice from several grapes to achieve the structure and nuance necessary to truly delight the palate.

We are similarly relearning that building diversity into the cybersecurity workforce allows us to more easily tackle a wider range of problems and get to better, faster solutions.

Essential New Facets of Diversity

I don’t want to strain the metaphor too much, but we can certainly learn from our winemaking friends. Just as they search for juice with attributes such as structure, fruitiness and acidity, we search for ways to add the personal attributes that will be accretive to the problem-solving prowess and design genius of our teams. One of my personal quests has been to add the right mix of business skills to the technical teams I have had the honor to lead.

On my personal best practice adoption tour, I have made many familiar stops. I learned and then taught Philip Crosby’s Total Quality Management system and fretted about our company’s whole-product marketing mastery in the ’90s (thank you, Geoffrey Moore, author of “Crossing the Chasm”). Over the last 15 years, I implemented ITIL, lean principles and agile development (see the “Manifesto for Agile Software Development”), applied core and context thinking (“Dealing with Darwin”) to help my teams establish skill set development plans, and used horizon planning (introduced in “The Alchemy of Growth” by Baghai, Coley and White) to assign budget.

Throughout this journey, I kept trying to add the best practices that were intended for development, manufacturing and marketing to the mix. I was just not content to “stay in my lane.” I did this because I believe that speaking the language of development, manufacturing and marketing — aka the language of business — is essential for technology and security.

Innovation and the Language of Business

As a security evangelist, I have long advocated that chief information security officers (CISOs) must learn how to be relevant to the business and fluent in the language of business. A side benefit I did not fully explore at the time was how much the diversity of thought helped me in problem-solving.

We have been discovering the value of diversity of thought through programs such as IBM’s new collar initiative and the San Diego Cyber Center of Excellence (CCOE)’s Internship and Apprenticeship Programs. IBM’s initiative and the CCOE’s program rethink recruiting to pull workers into cybersecurity from adjacent disciplines, not just adjacent fields.

Toward the end of my stay at Intuit, I participated in a pilot program that brought innovation catalyst training to leaders outside of product development. Innovation catalysts teach the use of design thinking to deliver what the customer truly wants in a product. While learning the techniques I would later use to coach my teams and tease out well-designed services — services that would delight our internal customers — I was struck by an observation: People of different job disciplines didn’t just solve problems in different ways, they brought different values and valued different outcomes.

So, another form of diversity we should not leave out is the diversity of values derived from different work histories and job functions. We know that elegant, delightful systems that are socially and culturally relevant, and that respect our time, our training and the job we are trying to do, will have a higher adoption rate. We struggle with how to develop these systems with built-in security because we know that bolted-on security has too many seams to ever be secure.

To achieve built-in security, we’ve tried to embed security people in development and DevOps processes, but we quickly run out of security people. We try to supplement with security-minded employees, advocates and evangelists, but no matter how many people we throw at the problem, we are all like Sisyphus, trying to push an ever-bigger rock up an ever-bigger hill.

The Value of Inherently Secure Products

The problem, I think, is that we have not learned how to effectively incorporate the personal value and social value of inherently secure products. We think “make it secure too” instead of “make it secure first.” When I think about the design teams I’ve worked with as I was taking the catalyst training, the very first focus was on deep customer empathy — ultimate empathy for the job the customer is trying to do with our product or service.

People want the products they use to be secure; they expect it, they demand it. But we make it so difficult for them to act securely, and they become helpless. Helpless people do not feel empowered to act safely, they become resigned to being hacked, impersonated or robbed.

The kind of thinking I am advocating for — deep empathy for the users of the products and services we sell and deploy — has led to what I believe, and studies such as IBM’s “Future of Identity Study” bear out, is the imminent elimination of the password. No matter how hard we try, we are not going to get significantly better password management. Managing 100-plus passwords will never be easy. Not having a password is easy, at least for the customer.

We have to create a new ecosystem for authentication, including approaches such as the intelligent authentication that IAmI provides. Creating this new ecosystem gives us an opportunity to delight the customer. Writing rules about what kinds of passwords one can use and creating policies to enforce the rules only delights auditors and regulators. I won’t say we lack the empathy gene, but our empathy is clearly misplaced.

Variety Is the Spice of the Cybersecurity Workforce

As we strive to create products and services that are inherently secure — aka secure by design — let’s add the diversity of approach, diversity of values and advocacy for deep customer empathy to the cybersecurity workforce diversity we are building. Coming back to my recent learning experience, I much prefer wines that were crafted by selecting grape attributes that delight the palate over ones that were easy to farm.

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Author: Bill Bonney

2FA, Authentication, citrix, Data loss, Iran, Iridium group, Resecurity, Security threats,

Citrix admits attackers breached its network – what we know

On Friday, software giant Citrix issued a short statement admitting that hackers recently managed to get inside its internal network. According to a statement by chief information security officer Stan Black, the company was told of the attack by the FBI on 6 March, since when it had established that attackers had taken “business documents” […]

This post appeared first on Naked Security Blog by Sophos
Author: John E Dunn

Authentication, certificates, Computer Security, Internet, SSL/TLS, SSL/TLS certificates,

Hackers Purchasing Abused SSL/TLS certificates From Dark Web Markets to Victimize their Targets

SSL/TLS certificates

SSL/TLS certificates are the backbones of secure communication, it encrypts the sensitive information that sent across the internet, so that, only the intended recipients can get access to it. The SSL/TLS certificates provides trust with lock icon and also provides authentication, which makes you to ensure the information has been sent to the correct server. […]

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Artificial intelligence, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Authentication, Automation, Biometric Security, Blockchain, cryptocurrency, Machine Learning, Social Engineering, Threat Detection,

Don’t Believe Your Eyes: Deepfake Videos Are Coming to Fool Us All

In 2017, an anonymous Reddit user under the pseudonym “deepfakes” posted links to pornographic videos that appeared to feature famous mainstream celebrities. The videos were fake. And the user created them using off-the-shelf artificial intelligence (AI) tools.

Two months later, Reddit banned the deepfakes account and related subreddit. But the ensuing scandal revealed a range of university, corporate and government research projects under way to perfect both the creation and detection of deepfake videos.

Where Deepfakes Come From (and Where They’re Going)

Deepfakes are created using AI technology called generative adversarial networks (GANs), which can be used broadly to create fake data that can pass as real data. To oversimplify how GANs work, two machine learning (ML) algorithms are pitted against each other. One creates fake data and the other judges the quality of that fake data against a set of real data. They continue this contest at massive scale, continually getting better at making fake data and judging it. When both algorithms become extremely good at their respective tasks, the product is a set of high-quality fake data.

In the case of deepfakes, the authentic data set consists of hundreds or thousands of still photographs of a person’s face, so the algorithm has a wide selection of images showing the face from different angles and with different facial expressions to choose from and judge against to experimentally add to the video during the learning phase.

Carnegie Mellon University scientists even figured out how to impose the style of one video onto another using a technique called Recycle-GAN. Instead of convincingly replacing someone’s face with another, the Recycle-GAN process enables the target to be used like a puppet, imitating every head movement, facial expression and mouth movement in the exact way as the source video. This process is also more automated than previous methods.

Most of these videos today are either pornography featuring celebrities, satire videos created for entertainment or research projects showing rapidly advancing techniques. But deepfakes are likely to become a major security concern in the future. Today’s security systems rely heavily on surveillance video and image-based biometric security. Since the majority of breaches occur because of social engineering-based phishing attacks, it’s certain that criminals will turn to deepfakes for this purpose.

Deepfake Videos Are Getting Really Good, Really Fast

The earliest publicly demonstrated deepfake videos tended to show talking heads, with the subjects seated. Now, full-body deepfakes developed in separate research projects at Heidelberg University and the University of California, Berkeley are able to transfer the movements of one person to another. One form of authentication involves gait analysis. These kinds of full-body deepfakes suggest that the gait of an authorized person could be transferred in video to an unauthorized person.

Here’s another example: Many cryptocurrency exchanges authenticate users by making them photograph themselves holding up their passport or some other form of identification as well as a piece of paper with something like the current date written on it. This can be easily foiled with Photoshop. Some exchanges, such as Binance, found many attempts by criminals to access accounts using doctored photos, so they and others moved to video instead of photos. Security analysts worry that it’s only a matter of time before deepfakes will become so good that neither photos nor videos like these will be reliable.

The biggest immediate threat for deepfakes and security, however, is in the realm of social engineering. Imagine a video call or message that appears to be your work supervisor or IT administrator, instructing you to divulge a password or send a sensitive file. That’s a scary future.

What’s Being Done About It?

Increasingly realistic deepfakes have enormous implications for fake news, propaganda, social disruption, reputational damage, evidence tampering, evidence fabrication, blackmail and election meddling. Another concern is that the perfection and mainstreaming of deepfakes will cause the public to doubt the authenticity of all videos.

Security specialists, of course, will need to have such doubts as a basic job requirement. Deepfakes are a major concern for digital security specifically, but also for society at large. So what can be done?

University Research

Some researchers say that analyzing the way a person in a video blinks, or how often they blink, is one way to detect a deepfake. In general, deepfakes show insufficient or even nonexistent blinking, and the blinking that does occur often appears unnatural. Breathing is another movement usually not present in deepfakes, along with hair (it often looks blurry or painted on).

Researchers from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Albany developed a deepfake detection method that uses AI technology to look for natural blinking, breathing and even a pulse. It’s only a matter of time, however, before deepfakes make these characteristics look truly “natural.”

Government Action

The U.S. government is also taking precautions: Congress could consider a bill in the coming months to criminalize both the creation and distribution of deepfakes. Such a law would likely be challenged in court as a violation of the First Amendment, and would be difficult to enforce without automated technology for identifying deepfakes.

The government is working on the technology problem, too. The National Science Foundation (NSF), Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Agency (IARPA) are looking for technology to automate the identification of deepfakes. DARPA alone has reportedly spent $68 million on a media forensics capability to spot deepfakes, according to CBC.

Private Technology

Private companies are also getting in on the action. A new cryptographic authentication tool called Amber Authenticate can run in the background while a device records video. As reported by Wired, the tool generates hashes — “scrambled representations” — of the data at user-determined intervals, which are then recorded on a public blockchain. If the video is manipulated in any way, the hashes change, alerting the viewer to the probability that the video has been tampered with. A dedicated player feature shows a green frame for portions of video that are faithful to the origina, and a red frame around video segments that have been altered. The system has been proposed for police body cams and surveillance video.

A similar approach was taken by a company called Factom, whose blockchain technology is being tested for border video by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), according to Wired.

Security Teams Should Prepare for Anything and Everything

The solution to deepfakes may lie in some combination of education, technology and legislation — but none of these will work without the technology part. Because when deepfakes get really good, as they inevitably will, only machines will be able to tell the real videos from the fake ones. This deepfake technology is coming, but nobody knows when. We should also assume that an arms race will arise with malicious deepfake actors inventing new methods to overcome the latest detection systems.

Security professionals need to consider the coming deepfake wars when analyzing future security systems. If they’re video or image based — everything from facial recognition to gait analysis — additional scrutiny is warranted.

In addition, you should add video to the long list of media you cannot trust. Just as training programs and digital policies make clear that email may not come from who it appears to come from, video will need to be met with similar skepticism, no matter how convincing the footage. Deepfake technology will also inevitably be deployed for blackmail purposes, which will be used for extracting sensitive information from companies and individuals.

The bottom line is that deepfake videos that are indistinguishable from authentic videos are coming, and we can scarcely imagine what they’ll be used for. We should start preparing for the worst.

The post Don’t Believe Your Eyes: Deepfake Videos Are Coming to Fool Us All appeared first on Security Intelligence.

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Author: Mike Elgan

Access Governance, Access Management, Authentication, Authentication Systems, Data Protection, Fraud Protection, Identity & Access, Identity and Access Management (IAM), Identity Governance, Identity Management, Multifactor Authentication (MFA), Password, Password Management, Password Protection, password reuse, verification systems,

Are Passwords Killing Your Customer Experience? Try Passwordless Authentication

Creating a seamless, secure experience for your legitimate users is a challenge. Most users are good and deserve a frictionless experience, but the less than 0.1 percent of users that are suspected to be rogue actors, according to IBM Trusteer research, spoil the party for everyone. These are the users who commit online fraud, steal data, bypass formal application programming interfaces (APIs) and skew site analytics. The rest of us can thank them for the frustration associated with tedious login rituals.

We’re drowning customers in a sea of passwords and expecting them to stay afloat. Passwords are not only a pain, but incredibly easy to hack. So how is the industry combating these issues related to passwords and the pains of usability? Shockingly, many organizations are still relying only on passwords as a form of authentication, and we know they’re failing. According to a Javelin Strategy & Research survey, 1 in 5 customers fails to authenticate. This could be due to multiple factors, one of which is forgetting their own password.

How Can Companies Go Passwordless?

Let’s take a step back and think about it: As a consumer yourself, how many online accounts do you have, and how many different passwords do you need to create to outsmart fraudsters? All these credentials are nearly impossible to manage.

If we know a large percentage of our users are legitimate, then let’s deliver the seamless but secure experience they expect and, in the end, help drive digital sales. So what does going passwordless really mean, and how is it possible?

The passwordless experience is based on identifying unauthorized access to web and mobile applications and sensitive operations. Organizations can identify these issues by using risk-based authentication and continuous trust validation technologies, which provide services such as behavioral analysis, device identification and authenticity, phone number and email intelligence, identity linkages, and session and network attributes to build this trust. These forces are what make passwordless authentication possible because they identify positive users and question the high risk users.

Examples of a Passwordless Customer Experience

How does this work in practice? Below are some examples of how passwordless authentication can transform and improve your customer experience.

  • A new customer registers on a site or application by confirming his or her email or phone. For subsequent logins, the customer is auto-enrolled as a trusted user.
  • A registered user accesses a site seamlessly after the system detects no threats or compromises on the trusted device.
  • A user accesses a service from a new device by confirming the email or phone number associated with the account and entering his or her credentials. After the device is labeled as trusted, it is auto-enrolled for seamless entry.
  • A user accesses a service seamlessly and browses with continuous authentication in the background until he or she reaches sensitive information. At this point, the user is prompted to enter his or her two-factor authentication (2FA) information before accessing this data.

If you go passwordless, you’re guaranteed to improve your customer experience. A system free of clunky passwords helps streamline customers’ buying journeys and distinguish between legitimate users and fraudsters. Most importantly, it enables your users to enjoy a seamless experience on any digital platform. So what are you waiting for? Now is the time to give your customers the experience they deserve and the security they demand with passwordless authentication.

Register for the Feb. 27 webinar to learn more

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Author: Kelly Lappin

Authentication, Connected Devices, Credentials, Endpoint, Health Care, Healthcare, Healthcare Industry, healthcare security, Medical Data, Mobile Security, Network, Network Security, Patch Management, Risk, Risk Management,

What Does Healthcare Cybersecurity Look Like in a Future of Connected Medical Devices?

As technology continues to transform the way healthcare is delivered, the industry is burdened by the growing cybersecurity risks inherent in the expansion of connected devices. Understanding that each connected device opens another pathway for threat actors, it’s incumbent upon device manufacturers to keep security foremost throughout the development life cycle.

The question is, how can manufacturers ensure the security of the devices they create? Furthermore, what can healthcare companies do to mitigate the risks inherent in the future of healthcare cybersecurity?

Taking the Pulse of Health Care Cybersecurity Today

Because they are so often the target of cyberattacks, healthcare organizations took a beating once again in 2018. We saw some significant data breaches last year, such as the attack on Med Associates where more than 270,000 patient records were breached.

New research from Clearwater found that the three most common vulnerabilities in healthcare cybersecurity are user authentication deficiencies, endpoint leakage and excessive user permissions — which, combined, account for nearly 37 percent of all critical risk scenarios. Credential misuse continues to threaten enterprise security across all sectors, including healthcare.

“When malicious actors gain access to accounts — whether by weak passwords or phishing attacks — they are given the literal keys to the kingdom,” said Justin Jett, director of audit and compliance for Plixer.

When it comes to medical devices, however, cybersecurity is making progress. According to Leon Lerman, CEO of Cynerio, “We are currently in the increased awareness state where healthcare providers, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and device manufacturers are starting to be more active in the space.”

Moving Toward a More Secure Future

The good news is that healthcare providers at hospitals are starting to include cybersecurity requirements in their procurement process. In fact, some are no longer depending on the medical device manufacturers and instead actively looking for dedicated device security solutions.

According to Lerman, the FDA and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently launched a joint initiative to “increase coordination in dealing with threats related to medical devices.” In addition, HHS released cybersecurity best practices to help healthcare organizations manage threats and protect patients from internet of things (IoT)-based attacks and other threats.

Manufacturers have not progressed alongside hospitals, though there are more conversations about strengthening the security of their devices, taking part in cybersecurity testing and streamlining the patching process. In reality, though, it’s only been within the last decade that these conversations have been taking place, and according to Anura Fernando, chief innovation architect at UL, medical devices can take at least that long to develop and get into the market.

“If you couple that with the fact that many devices are used by hospitals for 20–25 years, you can see that there is a major legacy systems issue, with many devices lacking security controls at the device level. Based on that timing offset, it could easily be five to 10 years before we see the complete turnover of equipment in use by hospitals that didn’t even have cybersecurity considered during design,” Fernando explained.

The Challenges of Securing Connected Devices

Legacy systems present myriad cybersecurity challenges, but there are other obstacles to securing medical devices. One that is closely related to legacy equipment is that of component obsolescence.

“When you consider the lengthy development timelines associated with most devices, it can easily be the case that security-related components such as operating systems and microcontrollers cease to be supported by the component vendor soon after a medical device reaches the market,” Fernando said.

As a result, maintenance activities such as security patches are no longer feasible for hospitals. Let’s say that security patches are released by the vendors, however. The time and cost it takes to validate these updates to devices is onerous.

“Even once this validation process is complete, it can be a daunting task to manage the deployment of a patch into the highly dynamic operational life cycle phase of a device, which may be in process of performing critical functions like life support,” said Fernando.

How Health Care Organizations Can Mitigate Security Risks

You can’t protect what you can’t see, so proper visibility into connected devices and their ecosystem is critical. Once you have visibility, understand the risk that each of these devices poses and take necessary proactive measures to minimize this risk, such as network segmentation, patching and removing devices from networks.

By monitoring device behavior and understanding what devices do in the context of medical workflows, you can detect anomalies when devices behave suspiciously. And, of course, early detection enables quicker response.

Strengthening password requirements can help you reduce risk, but when malicious actors gain a foothold, organizations need network traffic analytics to understand where the attack started and determine whether it has spread.

“By looking at how credentials are used throughout the network and creating a baseline of normal usage, network and security teams can be alerted to anomalous credential use and stop attacks as they happen,” Jett said.

Furthermore, all of the different stakeholders in the healthcare value chain need to be invested in securing the future of connected healthcare. Since this is a widespread effort across the healthcare environment, industry leaders should develop guidelines and standards to evaluate whether products and devices meet cybersecurity standards.

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Author: Kacy Zurkus